Events

Feb 26
All Sizes Fit Art Recruitment8:00 a.m.

All Sizes Fit is a positive body image campaign that aims to increase body positivity and decrease the social pressures associated with obtaining an "ideal body." All...
February 1–26

All Sizes Fit is a positive body image campaign that aims to increase body positivity and decrease the social pressures associated with obtaining an "ideal body." All Sizes Fit focuses on three principles:

Attention: Be in touch with your body and its signals. Your body is excellent at regulating and letting you know what it needs in order to perform optimally.
Appreciation: Appreciate everything your body allows you to do and the pleasure it provides. It is because of your body that you can engage in the activities you love and enjoy what life has to offer.
Acceptance: Accept all the assets you have rather than longing for what you do not. Much of your body composition is predetermined by your genetics.

Please submit this form if you would like to enter the 2021 All Sizes Fit Virtual Art Show. Your submission should be a representation of body positivity, body acceptance, body image, and/or All Sizes Fit. If you plan to enter more than one piece, please fill out this form for each piece.

https://oregon.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9sK3KbpAMOuELsy

All entries due by Friday, February 26, 2021. After we receive your piece digitally we will send another form for you to complete where you can share more about your piece (e.g. title, artist statement, etc.)

1st Place Prize: $100 Duck Store Gift Certificate
2nd Place Prize: $75 Duck Store Gift Certificate
3rd Place Prize: $50 Duck Store Gift Certificate
Honorable Mentions (10): $10 Duck Store Gift Certificates

For any questions please contact Suzie Stadelman at sstadelm@uoregon.edu

We will accept entries from non-UO students, but only current UO students are eligible to win prizes. All entries will be screened to make sure they don't contain triggering or inappropriate imagery.

Feb 26
UOTeach-In on Educational Equity & Anti-Oppressive Pedagogies4:00 p.m.

The UOTeach teacher licensure and Sapsik’wałá programs have collaborated with a host of campus and national scholars to offer a weeklong UOTeachIN on educational...
February 22–27

The UOTeach teacher licensure and Sapsik’wałá programs have collaborated with a host of campus and national scholars to offer a weeklong UOTeachIN on educational equity.

Each Monday-Friday evening offers two sessions which approach anti-oppressive pedagogy from their respective equity lenses; including Love Authenticity Courage Empathy LACE, All Students Belong, indigenous resilience practices, 1619 teaching hard history, anticolonial teaching, trauma-informed, technology agency, This is My America, Latinx community, and bilingual/bicultural education.

UOTeachIN culminates Saturday, Feb 27 at 1:00 p.m. with our keynote speaker, Dr. Bettina Love, author of We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and The Pursuit of Educational Freedom, and co-founder of the Abolitionist Teaching Network. Dr. Love will discuss the struggles and the possibilities of committing ourselves to an abolitionist goal of educational freedom, as opposed to reform, and moving beyond what she calls the educational survival complex.

Mar 3
UOTeach Prospective Student Info Session4:00 p.m.

Are you interested in becoming a K-12 teacher leader? The UO College of Education offers elementary and mid/high school teaching licensure to step into the classroom and actively...
February 3 2021–January 5 2022

Are you interested in becoming a K-12 teacher leader? The UO College of Education offers elementary and mid/high school teaching licensure to step into the classroom and actively impact the lives and learning of youth! And it is ranked among the top education grad schools by U.S. News & World Report. Join us to learn more about the UOTeach program, our application process, prerequisites, and teacher education scholarship opportunities. 

Open to all majors. Register via external Zoom link.

Monthly Prospective Student Info Sessions Days: Wednesdays Time: 4:00–5:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time 2021 Info Session dates: Feb 3, Mar 3, April 7, May 5, June 2, July 7, August 4, Sept 1, Oct 6, Nov 3, Dec 1

Learn more about UOTeach at https://education.uoregon.edu/uoteach Contact us at uoteach@uoregon.edu or call 541-346-1360 * We offer several jumpstart teacher pathway options for current UO students looking to enter UOTeach licensure (https://uoteach.uoregon.edu/running-start/)

Mar 4
Let's (Tele) Talk5:00 p.m.

Colleen McCarthy will be available on Thursdays from 5:00-7:00 p.m. Colleen is a Senior Staff Therapist and Psychologist Resident at University Counseling...
January 7–March 18

Colleen McCarthy will be available on Thursdays from 5:00-7:00 p.m. Colleen is a Senior Staff Therapist and Psychologist Resident at University Counseling Services. 
Click here for Waiting Room

Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a University Counseling Services staff member.
 
What makes Let’s (Tele)Talk different from counseling services at UCS?


No appointment necessary (first-come, first served)
No paperwork to be completed
Easy access support and consultation


 
Let’s (Tele)Talk is especially helpful for students who:


Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it
Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling
Would like to consult with a UCS staff member about what actual therapy looks like
Would like to meet with one of our UCS identity-based specialists
Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do


 
How does Let’s (Tele)Talk work?

While typically offered in various campus locations, Let’s (Tele)Talk will now be offered via Zoom. Click on the relevant link below to access a Zoom meeting with a Let’s (Tele)Talk counselor. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the counselor is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and is meant to be used on an as-needed basis.

Mar 9
Conoce Tu Comunidad4:00 p.m.

This is an informal discussion space for Latinx/Hispanic communities and allies to connect, share stories of resiliency, and provide mentorship and support for you to succeed! For...
February 9–March 9

This is an informal discussion space for Latinx/Hispanic communities and allies to connect, share stories of resiliency, and provide mentorship and support for you to succeed! For any questions contact Karla Perez-Young at kperezy2@uoregon.edu

Mar 12
SLGS Seminar: Jungah Lee, "Topic-based style (pronunciation) shifts of North Korean refugees living in South Korea"2:00 p.m.

Topic-based style (pronunciation) shifts of North Korean refugees living in South Korea Although the North and South Korean languages are mutually intelligible, due to the 71...
March 12 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Topic-based style (pronunciation) shifts of North Korean refugees living in South Korea

Although the North and South Korean languages are mutually intelligible, due to the 71 years of physical separation between two countries, drastic linguistic divergence has been observed. Currently, more than 30 thousand North Korean (NK) refugees are living in South Korea (SK). However, because of their nonstandard dialect, they experience discrimination in job interviews and isolation within South Korean society (Kim & Jang, 2007). More specifically, they have reported that their nonstandard pronunciation and accented speech affected their ability to adapt to life in SK (Lee, 2009). This study aims to examine NK speakers’ speech patterns in stop production, and how it may shift depending on various contextual factors, with the goal of exploring the stance(s) NK speakers may take towards their lives in South Korea (SK). Three research questions are proposed.

To what extent do NK speakers change their stop production in reading versus conversational speech conditions? To what extent do NK and SK topics of conversation in sociolinguistic interviews affect their stop production? To what extent does the topic and their stance(s) towards NK and SK affect their stop production? 

This study can reveal factors that influence NK speakers’ stop pronunciation as well as shifts in their production. What’s more, this study can shed light on intraspeaker variation research in sociolinguistics and second dialect acquisition by providing findings on stop production patterns of NK speakers whose speech has yet to be thoroughly investigated.

Jungah Lee is a PhD student in Korean linguistics, East Asian languages and literature. Her research interests include phonetics, sociophonetics, second dialect acquisition, and sociolinguistics

Are you a linguist? Read a more specialized abstract here