Events

Jan 28
Imposter Syndrome2:00 p.m.

Have you ever felt like you’re not “smart enough” for college or for a particular position on campus? Imposter syndrome is a common feeling among college...
January 28 2:00 p.m.–2:50 p.m.

Have you ever felt like you’re not “smart enough” for college or for a particular position on campus? Imposter syndrome is a common feeling among college students. In this workshop, students will learn about how imposter syndrome works, strategies for increasing confidence, and ways to reduce self-doubt. This workshop is open to UO students, staff, and faculty.

Jan 28
Let's (Tele) Talk5:00 p.m.

Colleen McCarthy will be available on Thursdays from 5:00-7:00 p.m. Colleen is a Senior Staff Therapist and Psychologist Resident at University Counseling...
January 7–March 18

Colleen McCarthy will be available on Thursdays from 5:00-7:00 p.m. Colleen is a Senior Staff Therapist and Psychologist Resident at University Counseling Services. 
Click here for Waiting Room

Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a University Counseling Services staff member.
 
What makes Let’s (Tele)Talk different from counseling services at UCS?


No appointment necessary (first-come, first served)
No paperwork to be completed
Easy access support and consultation


 
Let’s (Tele)Talk is especially helpful for students who:


Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it
Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling
Would like to consult with a UCS staff member about what actual therapy looks like
Would like to meet with one of our UCS identity-based specialists
Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do


 
How does Let’s (Tele)Talk work?

While typically offered in various campus locations, Let’s (Tele)Talk will now be offered via Zoom. Click on the relevant link below to access a Zoom meeting with a Let’s (Tele)Talk counselor. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the counselor is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and is meant to be used on an as-needed basis.

Feb 3
Making Arguments: Writing Webinar for Graduate Students3:00 p.m.

Despite the fact that all scholars need them, most of us receive very little training about how to craft complex arguments. Sure, we teach students how to do it all the time, but...
February 3 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Despite the fact that all scholars need them, most of us receive very little training about how to craft complex arguments. Sure, we teach students how to do it all the time, but somehow, when it comes to doing it ourselves, it never seems so simple. Not only that but, the larger a project is, the longer writers think about them, the more complex, confusing, and ungraspable they seem to become. The good news is that not only are there simple reasons why the same techniques you teach your students might not work in just the same way for you, but that there are strategies that can help the academic researcher create arguments. In this webinar I’ll be explaining a technique that I use for helping my clients create and refine working arguments and how and why this is connected to the practice of Daily Writing.

 

Please RSVP HERE

Feb 11
Making Arguments: Writing Webinar for Graduate Students4:00 p.m.

Despite the fact that all scholars need them, most of us receive very little training about how to craft complex arguments. Sure, we teach students how to do it all the time, but...
February 11 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Despite the fact that all scholars need them, most of us receive very little training about how to craft complex arguments. Sure, we teach students how to do it all the time, but somehow, when it comes to doing it ourselves, it never seems so simple. Not only that but, the larger a project is, the longer writers think about them, the more complex, confusing, and ungraspable they seem to become. The good news is that not only are there simple reasons why the same techniques you teach your students might not work in just the same way for you, but that there are strategies that can help the academic researcher create arguments. In this webinar I’ll be explaining a technique that I use for helping my clients create and refine working arguments and how and why this is connected to the practice of Daily Writing.

 

Please RSVP HERE

Feb 19
Investing 101 for Graduate Students1:00 p.m.

This workshop will provide an introduction to the basics of investing geared toward newly-grads and graduate students. We will begin by discussing the difference between investing...
February 19 1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

This workshop will provide an introduction to the basics of investing geared toward newly-grads and graduate students. We will begin by discussing the difference between investing and trading, followed by different types of investing goals, both long-term and short-term. We will touch on different types of investment vehicles (i.e. stocks, bonds, mutual funds, etc.), as well as the expected risks and returns associated with them. We will conclude with some tips on what resources are available and how to pick a broker that best suits your needs. 

Please RSVP HERE

Mar 12
SLGS Seminar: Jungah Lee, "Topic- based Style (pronunciation) shifts of North Korean refugees living in South Korea"2:00 p.m.

Topic- based Style (pronunciation) shifts of North Korean refugees living in South Korea Although the North and South Korean languages are mutually intelligible, due to the 71...
March 12 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Topic- based Style (pronunciation) shifts of North Korean refugees living in South Korea

Although the North and South Korean languages are mutually intelligible, due to the 71 years of physical separation between two countries, drastic linguistic divergence has been observed. Currently, more than 30 thousand North Korean (NK) refugees are living in South Korea (SK). However, because of their nonstandard dialect, they experience discrimination in job interviews and isolation within South Korean society (Kim & Jang, 2007). More specifically, they have reported that their nonstandard pronunciation and accented speech affected their ability to adapt to life in SK (Lee, 2009). This study aims to examine NK speakers’ speech patterns in stop production, and how it may shift depending on various contextual factors, with the goal of exploring the stance(s) NK speakers may take towards their lives in South Korea (SK). Three research questions are proposed.

To what extent do NK speakers change their stop production in reading versus conversational speech conditions? To what extent do NK and SK topics of conversation in sociolinguistic interviews affect their stop production? To what extent does the topic and their stance(s) towards NK and SK affect their stop production? 

This study can reveal factors that influence NK speakers’ stop pronunciation as well as shifts in their production. What’s more, this study can shed light on intraspeaker variation research in sociolinguistics and second dialect acquisition by providing findings on stop production patterns of NK speakers whose speech has yet to be thoroughly investigated.

Jungah Lee is a PhD student in Korean linguistics, East Asian languages and literature. Her research interests include phonetics, sociophonetics, second dialect acquisition, and sociolinguistics

Are you a linguist? Read a more specialized abstract here