Events

Oct 26
Mandatory New GE Training12:00 a.m.

The Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) between the UO and the Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation (GTFF) requires that all Graduate Employees (GEs) complete four...
October 4–29

The Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) between the UO and the Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation (GTFF) requires that all Graduate Employees (GEs) complete four hours of required employment training during the first academic term in which a GE begins their first GE appointment.

This online training will address employment topics such as inclusive work environments, discrimination and sexual harassment policies, and other employee-related policies.

GEs will be sent an invitation to join the Canvas class at the beginning of the first term of GE employment. GEs will be compensated for completing the training with a stipend equivalent to four hours of pay at the GE level I minimum rate.

How to access the online training:

Navigate to community.uoregon.edu. Input your Duck ID and password. Click “Mandatory GE Training” on your Dashboard.

Questions? Contact the Division of Graduate Studies

Oct 27
Making the Transition to Scholarly Writing1:00 p.m.

While many students understand that the move into a graduate program will entail more concentrated study, longer hours both in and out of class, and a greater commitment to the...
October 27 1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.
Straub Hall, 251

While many students understand that the move into a graduate program will entail more concentrated study, longer hours both in and out of class, and a greater commitment to the intellectual life, many more have only a hazy idea of what scholarly writing is, what it should look like, and how to do it. This workshop is less about specific tools and tricks for producing quality academic writing and more about the shift in mindset that must accompany the transition into graduate work — about how to conceptualize your research and writing, and how to translate that onto the page. Though this workshop is aimed at introducing students to graduate-level writing, at least some of what I will present is new to even the most experienced graduate students.

Oct 30
GRADLab--STEM Graduate Program Fair for Underrepresented Students8:45 a.m.

Attend the GEM Virtual Grad Lab hosted by the UO, OSU, and UW. Designed for all STEM undergraduates and master's students considering pursuing a PhD. Join the premier...
October 30 8:45 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

Attend the GEM Virtual Grad Lab hosted by the UO, OSU, and UW. Designed for all STEM undergraduates and master's students considering pursuing a PhD.

Join the premier organization supporting qualified students from underrepresented communities pursuing graduate degrees in applied science and engineering funded by leading corporations, government laboratories, top universities, and top research institutions. 

This virtual webinar topics include:


Why Graduate School
How to Competitively Apply to Graduate School
How to Fund Graduate School
Voices from the Field Graduate Student Panel


Learn more about the GRADLAB here

Register for the webinar here

Nov 5
“Rare Birds and Rare Books: The Species as Work of Art”10:30 a.m.

Interdisciplinary 101 returns for the fall term in two weeks at the EMU. We will be back in person hosting Gordon Sayre as he presents “Rare Birds and Rare Books: The...
November 5 10:30 a.m.–noon
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Lease-Crutcher-Lewis Room, Rm 23

Interdisciplinary 101 returns for the fall term in two weeks at the EMU. We will be back in person hosting Gordon Sayre as he presents “Rare Birds and Rare Books: The Species as Work of Art”.



Professor Sayre is Head of the English department at the University of Oregon and Director of Undergraduate studies. His research interests include Early American and Native American studies.

His recent publications include The Memoir of Lieutenant Dumont, 1715-1747: A Sojourner in the French Atlantic, The Indian Chief as Tragic Hero: Native Resistance and the Literatures of America, from Moctezuma to Tecumseh, and American Captivity Narratives: An Anthology.

From Professor Sayre’s words:



In this study of the leading bird artists of 18th and 19th-century America, Mark Catesby and John James Audubon, I argue that this distinction between consumption and observation, between the commodification of animal products and of animal images, is not so obvious as it seems. Natural history books constitute a continuum between bodily specimens and textual representations–some guides to grasses and mosses have been published with actual specimens mounted on their pages. Catesby’s and Audubon’s books were elite luxury products marketed as the most colorful, lifelike representations ever created, based on observations of living birds in the wild. The engravings were hand-colored and fewer than 250 complete sets of each were produced. They were sold by subscription at the cost of two guineas per issue. At the outset of his publication project in 1827 Audubon wrote in his journal of his project as “a book that in fifty years will be sold at immense prices because of its rarity.” Indeed, bibliographers have referred to The Birds of America as “an endangered book” and have tracked down every copy. It is among the most valuable books on earth.

 

I argue here that an economic calculus of scarcity and value structures aesthetic representations of birds in books in much the same way as it manages endangered bird populations in the wild. The Ivory-billed woodpecker, painted by both artists, has likely been extinct since the 1930s, but ornithologists and birders continue to seek it with the mania of a search for sunken pirate’s treasure. The California Condor, painted by Audubon even though he never saw it alive in its habitat near the Pacific Coast, nearly went extinct in the 1980s, and since then has become a rare species curated and protected like a work of art. Biologists captured the last wild birds and zoos and sanctuaries raised chicks by hand, then released them into carefully selected habitats. Many millions of dollars have been spent reproducing and protecting a bird that now survives in numbers similar to the extant copies of Catesby’s and Audubon’s books.

 

***Sponsored by the Center for Environmental Futures, the event will be in the Erb Memorial Union in the Lease-Crutcher-Lewis Room, room 23, from 10:30am-12 pm. See you there!

Nov 9
Central Intelligence Agency (CIA): Career Info Session (undergrads & graduate students)5:00 p.m.

~ THIS IS AN ON-CAMPUS EVENT ~ A CIA representative will provide information regarding the CIA and the variety of career and internship opportunities available. The focus will...
November 9 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

~ THIS IS AN ON-CAMPUS EVENT ~

A CIA representative will provide information regarding the CIA and the variety of career and internship opportunities available. The focus will be on career opportunities across the Agency, details on application processes, and how to put together a competitive application. There will be time for questions.

Before this event, we recommend going to the website (cia.gov/careers) to familiarize yourself with the Agency’s mission, career opportunities, and hiring process. You can use the “Browse Jobs” function to investigate specific positions in analysis, clandestine, support, foreign languages, STEM, and targeting.

Undergraduates and graduate students of ALL academic disciplines are encouraged to participate. 

*All CIA positions require US citizenship and relocation to the Washington, DC metropolitan area.* 

**Please bring a hard copy resume to this event.**

 

QUESTIONS/MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS EVENT PLEASE CONTACT:
Tina Haynes, Employer Engagement Coordinator
University Career Center | thaynes@uoregon.edu | 541-346-6006

Nov 10
Central Intelligence Agency (CIA): 1:1 Office Hours (ON-CAMPUS)9:00 a.m.

Sit one-on-one with a CIA representative to learn more about intelligence officer career opportunities and life at the CIA. These are informal sessions (20 min)—not job...
November 10 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Willie and Donald Tykeson Hall, 50 Tykeson Hall, Garden Level

Sit one-on-one with a CIA representative to learn more about intelligence officer career opportunities and life at the CIA. These are informal sessions (20 min)—not job interviews—but come prepared with questions about positions found on cia.gov website. We can discuss resume style, cover letters, preparing for any interview, or anything else regarding working at the CIA! Undergraduates and graduate students of all academic disciplines are encouraged to attend. 

UO ON-CAMPUS CIA INFO SESSIONS
This is more than likely the only UO in-person visit for 2021-2022 - don't miss out!


CIA Career Info Session
Tuesday, 11/9 from 5:00pm-7:00pm - 111 Lillis
CIA Careers 'Appy Hour'
Wednesday, 11/10 from 4:30pm-5:30pm - 32 Tykeson Hall


*All CIA positions require U.S. citizenship and relocation to the Washington, DC metropolitan area.*

SIGN-UP FOR 1:1 OFFICE HOURS (20 min session)
1. sign-in to Handshake (https://uoregon.joinhandshake.com/login)
2. upload your résumé to Handshake (if not done already)
3. select “Events” then "On-Campus Interviews"
4. search for the organization you would like to interview with, submit resume, select interview time slot and review position description, qualifications and important deadlines.
Quick link: https://uoregon.joinhandshake.com/jobs/5541615/share_preview

QUESTIONS/MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS EVENT PLEASE CONTACT:
Tina Haynes, Employer Engagement Coordinator
University Career Center | thaynes@uoregon.edu | 541-346-6006

Nov 10
Postdoc Panel for Graduate Studentsnoon

The Division of Graduate Studies is hosting an online Postdoc panel for graduate students.  Learn from current UO postdocs about their experiences and what it is like as a...
November 10 noon–1:00 p.m.

The Division of Graduate Studies is hosting an online Postdoc panel for graduate students.  Learn from current UO postdocs about their experiences and what it is like as a postdoctoral scholar.  

UO Panelist Postdocs in the following fields share their experiences and answer your questions

Rachel E. Weissler, CAS Postdoctoral Scholar in Linguistics, Psychology, and Black Studies
Vivek Ramakrishna, CAS Postdoctoral Scholar in Physics
Anne Martin, CAS Postdoctoral Scholar in Neuroscience
Joseph Bruckner, CAS Postdoctoral Scholar in Neuroscience
Amy Webster, CAS Postdoctoral Scholar in Ecology and Evolution 

Please RSVP here if you plan to attend